Monthly Archives: March 2018

The Importance of a Strong Gluteus Medius

  Gluteus Medius Facts… The primary role of the gluteus medius is to act as a multi-planar hip stabilizer A stronger gluteus medius means better landing, running and squat mechanics Activation and strengthening of the gluteus medius is key to preventing pain and injury in your lower body. Inhibition of the gluteus medius has been shown to contribute to lumbar spine, hip and knee pain and even Achilles tendinopathy. Even without pain it can contribute to knee valgus and increase your risk for ACL injury. Read More +  Gluteus Medius Facts… The primary role of the gluteus medius is to act as a multi-planar hip stabilizer A stronger gluteus medius means better landing, running and squat mechanics Activation and strengthening of the gluteus medius is key to preventing pain and injury in your lower body. Inhibition of the gluteus medius has been shown to contribute to lumbar spine, hip and knee pain and even Achilles tendinopathy. Even without pain it can contribute to knee valgus and increase your risk for ACL injury. Read More +

Plantar Fasciopathy (AKA plantar fasciitis)

  Most of us who have experienced plantar fasciitis know first hand how debilitating and frustrating it can be. Every morning resembles being forced to walk on broken glass and you quickly become grumpy and dissatisfied. The prevalence in the general population is estimated to range from 3.6% to 7%  and may account for as much as 8% of all running-related injuries.   Plantar fasciitis is the most common cause of heel pain. The plantar fascia is the flat band of tissue (ligament) that connects your heel Read More +  Most of us who have experienced plantar fasciitis know first hand how debilitating and frustrating it can be. Every morning resembles being forced to walk on broken glass and you quickly become grumpy and dissatisfied. The prevalence in the general population is estimated to range from 3.6% to 7%  and may account for as much as 8% of all running-related injuries.   Plantar fasciitis is the most common cause of heel pain. The plantar fascia is the flat band of tissue (ligament) that connects your heel Read More +

Medial Tibial Stress Syndrome (aka Shin Splints)

Medial tibial stress syndrome (MTSS) is an overuse injury or repetitive-stress injury of the shin area. Various stress reactions of the tibia and surrounding musculature occur when the body is unable to heal properly in response to repetitive muscle contractions and tibial strain. MTSS occurs in 10-15% of running injuries and in  60% of leg pain syndromes. Pain is usually located along the distal and posteromedial tibia.               Risk factors runners without enough shock absorption (running on cement or uneven surfaces, Read More +Medial tibial stress syndrome (MTSS) is an overuse injury or repetitive-stress injury of the shin area. Various stress reactions of the tibia and surrounding musculature occur when the body is unable to heal properly in response to repetitive muscle contractions and tibial strain. MTSS occurs in 10-15% of running injuries and in  60% of leg pain syndromes. Pain is usually located along the distal and posteromedial tibia.               Risk factors runners without enough shock absorption (running on cement or uneven surfaces, Read More +

A PROTOCOL TO HELP YOUR HAMSTRING STRAIN

Today we’re talking about pulled hammies and how we can help them out. The hamstring needs length and strength, and importantly strength at length, meaning we need to be strong and able to tolerate stress in positions where the hamstring is on or near stretch. Enter the Askling L-Protocol. This protocol comes from a BJSM article on hamstring strains by Carl Askling et al. Overall, athletes who did this protocol returned to sport in 1 to 2 months. . Here’s how it goes. ????Extender: Twice Read More +Today we're talking about pulled hammies and how we can help them out. The hamstring needs length and strength, and importantly strength at length, meaning we need to be strong and able to tolerate stress in positions where the hamstring is on or near stretch. Enter the Askling L-Protocol. This protocol comes from a BJSM article on hamstring strains by Carl Askling et al. Overall, athletes who did this protocol returned to sport in 1 to 2 months. . Here's how it goes. ????Extender: Twice Read More +